Drumaa

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Drumaa
Irish grid reference H466315
District Fermanagh
County County Fermanagh
Constituent country Northern Ireland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ENNISKILLEN
Postcode district BT92
Dialling code 028 677 51
Police Northern Ireland
Fire Northern Ireland
Ambulance Northern Ireland
European Parliament Northern Ireland
UK Parliament Fermanagh and South Tyrone
NI Assembly Fermanagh and South Tyrone
List of places: UK • Northern Ireland • Fermanagh

Etymology

The official name of the townland is Dernaglug and Drumaa. There are no historical spellings of Dernaglug prior to the Ordnance Survey Name Book in 1833. Dernaglug: Ir. Doire na gClog ‘oak wood of the bells’ Drumaa: Ir. Droim Átha ‘ridge of the ford/field’

Drumaw Grand Jury Map 1817


Griffiths Valuation 1862

Occupier………………….. Lessor Patrick McCaffrey……………….Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L James Kearns…………………….Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & garden James McCaffrey………………...Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L Mary McAvinie………………… Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L Patrick Cassidy…………………. Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L Philip Sweeny…………………... Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L Anne Kearns……………………..Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L Patrick Kearns…………………...Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price H Os & L Alice Kearns……………………. Patrick Kearns H & garden Edward Maguire…………………Reps Gerald Fitzgerald and Harriet Price Herd’s house Os & L

1901 Census

Head of family……………..Landholder if different John Kieran James McMahon James Sweeney John Maguire

Drumaa Lane

Drumaa Lane goes from the main Dernawilt Rd to serve 8 households in this town land and one in Arnotts Grove. It is a private lane maintained by the people living there. It has been there for a very long time as it is clearly shown on the 1835 O.S. map. Before the New Line was made, the lane came in a continuous line from the Mount Darby road through Coolnamarrow and Drumma townlands stopping just short of Knockawaddy. The end of the lane is marked “Dernaglug” and a triangulation mark and a height of 375ft. From the edge of Knockawaddy another lane, locally known as Clig Lane goes straight to the Golan road. On the later maps, the beginning of Drumaa Lane has been moved closer to Roslea, using a lane that was already there, probably when the New Line was built in the 1840’s. Despite having to walk over 2 or 3 fields which was always recognised as allowed by the good-will of the owner, the people of Drumaa used this route to shop in Magheraveeley, which had the nearest shops and post office. Until postal vans were introduced and postal areas changed to suit, the Drumaa people were in the Magheraveeley postal district. This meant the postman left his bicycle at the end of Clig Lane and did Drumma post on foot and then returned to his bicycle to continue on along Golan road. The route was also used by parishioners going to St McCartan's R.C. Church in Aghadrumsee. A short distance from Drumaa lane there was another route which was very mucky for a distance of about 20 yards and the people who used it wanted to walk along the edge of the adjoining field which was dry. The owner refused permission for this and there were several law-cases about the matter. So many stories were told and contradicted and retold that the rest of the community expressed its opinion with the nick-name ‘The Perjured Pass’.


At one time there was a shop here possibly Lynch and also a shoemaker by the name of John Kearns. The surname Kearns has been in Drumaa and the townlands around for generations. They are in Drumaa and in Arnott Grove and Loughgare in the Griffiths Valuation 1862 but in the 1901 Census the spelling is Keiran. Mrs Anna Kearns tells us that a long time ago families were told that this was the proper way of spelling it but most have reverted to the old spelling. Her family farm has been in their possession since at least 1889 and several of the fields have names. The most significant is the "Altar Hill" where once there was a "Mass Rock". A tree still marks the spot. Two other names commemorate bygone owners: - "Ann’s meadow" and "William’s bottom". Others are more down to earth, the "Iron Gate" field, the "Long bog", the "Well bank" and the "Swamp" which used to flood six months of the year.

Neighbouring Townlands